Jefferson Health

Thomas Jefferson University Hospital First in Philadelphia Area to Enroll Patients in Trial for New Carotid Artery Disease Procedure

01/04/17

Thomas Jefferson University Hospital First in Philadelphia Area to Enroll Patients in Trial for New Carotid Artery Disease Procedure

PHILADELPHIA  — Vascular surgeons at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital are the first in the Philadelphia area to enroll patients in a post-approval clinical trial of a new procedure. Transcarotid Artery Revascularization, or TCAR, treats patients with carotid artery disease. Every year, more than 300,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with blockages in their carotid artery.  If left untreated, these blockages can fragment, flow to the brain and lead to a stroke. 

“Our goal is to treat the blockage with as little procedural risk as possible so that our patients can return to full and productive lives,” said Dr. Paul DiMuzio, Division Director of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. “It’s imperative for surgeons and physicians to keep a close eye on emerging research and new options which might change the way we treat this disease.”

The most widely utilized treatment option for severe carotid artery disease is a carotid endarterectomy (CEA).  CEA has proven quite effective in preventing stroke during and after the procedure, but carries risks of surgical complications like myocardial infarction (heart attack) and injury to nerves that are present near the surgical incision. Any repair of the carotid artery carries some risk of causing a stroke as a result of the repair itself. The TCAR procedure was designed to lower that risk.

The TCAR procedure post-approval trial is open to patients at high risk for traditional CEA.  During the TCAR procedure, blood flow is temporarily reversed in the carotid artery throughout the procedure to divert dangerous debris away from the brain, preventing a procedural stroke. During the intervention, a stent is implanted in the carotid artery to open and stabilize the narrowing. The stent stabilizes the plaque in the artery with the goal of reducing protecting patients from future stroke risk.

Jefferson is one of 30 sites in the United States currently enrolling patients into the ROADSTER 2 post-approval study.  The ROADSTER 2 study, a follow up to the ROADSTER study, is currently enrolling a minimum of 600 patients to be treated with the TCAR procedure using the ENROUTE Transcarotid Neuroprotection and Stent System. 

For more information, contact the Jefferson Vascular Center at 215-955-4375.

 

Media Contact:
Gail Benner
Gail.Benner@Jefferson.edu
215-955-2240