Jefferson University Hospitals

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  • ABC News Tweet Chat: Opioid Abuse in America
    ABC News Tweet Chat: Opioid Abuse in America
    Dr. Priya Mammen participated in an ABC News Tweet Chat moderated by Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Richard Besser on of opioid abuse.

  • ABC News Tweet Chat: Lead Poisoning
    ABC News Tweet Chat: Lead Poisoning
    What is lead poisoning? Dr. Gary Emmett participates in an ABC News Tweet Chat on the topic.

  • Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: A Question and Answer with Pediatrician Jay Greenspan
    Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: A Question and Answer with Pediatrician Jay Greenspan
    A conversation with Jay Greenspan, M.D., Chair of the Department of Pediatrics at Thomas Jefferson University/Nemours, about some of the issues surrounding pregnant women who are taking opioids.

  • Jefferson Professor to Develop Inclusive Child Care Program
    Jefferson Professor to Develop Inclusive Child Care Program
    The William Penn Foundation has awarded a grant to a Jefferson professor to develop and pilot a model of high-quality, inclusive child care in Philadelphia.

  • Jefferson Joins World Breastfeeding Awareness Week
    Jefferson Joins World Breastfeeding Awareness Week
    Jefferson is one of the six major birthing hospitals in Philadelphia joining together to promote breastfeeding as a healthy choice for mother and baby and to encourage support from family, friends and within the workplace and the community.

  • Too Much Screen Time for Kids?
    Too Much Screen Time for Kids?
    Pediatrician Gary A. Emmett discussed data suggesting American adolescents are spending too much time in front of the computer and TV.

  • Study Leads to Changes in Care Guidelines
    Study Leads to Changes in Care Guidelines
    A Jefferson/Nemours study of the care of newborns with suspected infections resulted in changes to treatment recommendations.

  • Feeding Your Kids, Tips for Parents
    Feeding Your Kids, Tips for Parents
    Jefferson pediatrician Judy Larkin, MD, answered questions on eating, food, and nutrition for children from birth to five in an ABC News “tweet chat.”

  • A Hidden Danger to Our Children
    A Hidden Danger to Our Children
    Jefferson pediatrician Gary Emmett, MD, discusses the potential long-term consequences of physical inactivity among American adolescents

  • Sleep, Academics and Emotions in Teenagers
    Sleep, Academics and Emotions in Teenagers
    Study suggests that lack of sleep could be contributing to emotional and academic difficulties among adolescents in middle and high school.

  • Bedtime Routines Influence Children’s Behavior
    Bedtime Routines Influence Children’s Behavior
    A recent study found that establishing a bedtime routine for your young kids, and sticking, has a positive impact the behavior of the children.

  • Healthy Snacks More Satisfying for Children
    Healthy Snacks More Satisfying for Children
    Researchers at Cornell University suggest that a combination of cheese and vegetables are the answer parents can turn to when the kids are pleading for a snack. The researchers found that the kids who ate cheese and vegetables consumed 72 percent fewer calories than those who were allowed to eat the chips.

  • Sending Elmo to Lunch with Your Kids
    Sending Elmo to Lunch with Your Kids
    Research published in the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine recently suggests that children are more likely to choose healthier food when that it is associated with popular cartoon characters.

  • Summer Fun Without Too Much Sun for Kids
    Summer Fun Without Too Much Sun for Kids
    Some sun is good for children, but overexposure and the painful sunburns that can result can have long-term health consequences and parents can take precautions to protect their children.

  • Treating Retinoblastoma – a Rare Eye Cancer in Kids – at Jefferson
    Treating Retinoblastoma – a Rare Eye Cancer in Kids – at Jefferson
    Vascular neurosurgeons at Jefferson Hospital for Neuroscience in collaboration with eye cancer specialists at Wills Eye Institute are using a new treatment called intra-arterial chemotherapy in which the chemotherapy drugs are delivered directly to the ophthalmic artery with the tumors.

  • Wash ‘Em for Handwashing Awareness Week
    Wash ‘Em for Handwashing Awareness Week
    National Handwashing Awareness Month may seem weird, but it is really about advocating a serious public health matter, particularly now as cold and flu season gets into full swing.

  • Heart Disease Prevention Should Start Early, Experts Say
    Heart Disease Prevention Should Start Early, Experts Say
    Recommendations from the NIH to test and address cardiovascular disease risk factors in children and adolescents including testing 9-11 year olds for high cholesterol.

  • When Does Shyness Become a Mental Health Issue?
    When Does Shyness Become a Mental Health Issue?
    I was always shy, hiding behind my mother in social situations. And I still consider myself shy – my wife would beg to differ – although through necessity and practice I am pretty good in most situations and have found some “tricks” to help. So, I was very interested in a study published online this more »

  • Allergy Doctors Give Tips on Avoiding a Truly Scary Halloween
    Allergy Doctors Give Tips on Avoiding a Truly Scary Halloween
    Halloween preparations are well underway in my house. My oldest daughter waited (relatively) patiently for months – about ten and a half months to be precise – to urge the decorating to begin. The key was the old, homemade, straw-filled scarecrow stuffed in a bag and shoved in the basement last year. When I didn’t more »

  • Fast-Paced Cartoons Appear to Diminish Attention in 4 Year Olds
    Fast-Paced Cartoons Appear to Diminish Attention in 4 Year Olds
    Okay, I admit it. Like most parents (I suspect), I sometimes use the boob tube to entertain my kids whether it is a shower in the morning or washing dishes in the evening. And yes, my wife doesn’t think that so much TV watching is a great – or good or even mediocre – idea. more »

  • Smokers’ Kids Miss More School
    Smokers’ Kids Miss More School
    Do you smoke around your children? Your habit may be causing them to miss school and you lose time at work taking care of them. Children who live in homes where one parent smoked missed an average of one day of school a year compared with kids living in smoke-free homes. And those students living more »

  • Is Integrative Medicine Right for Your Kids? 5 Myths Debunked
    Is Integrative Medicine Right for Your Kids? 5 Myths Debunked
    Parents spend a huge amount of time thinking about and making decisions about their children’s health and wellness on issues that range from the simple sniffles to complex decisions about selecting surgeons. Obviously, these issues can be confusing in today’s healthcare world – there are lots of options. Many parents, for example, want to provide more »

  • Expelling Soda from Schools Reduces Consumption
    Expelling Soda from Schools Reduces Consumption
    Back to school time is just around the corner and parents and kids are scrambling to get ready. With my oldest daughter entering kindergarten after Labor Day, this will my first back-to-school experience and I have to say all of us are a little on edge; excited but also wondering how the first day will more »

  • Teething Is Not Associated with Fever
    Teething Is Not Associated with Fever
    Every parent knows when their child is teething. There is the drooling, the irritability, the long, sleepless nights and the loss of appetite. Oh, and a low-grade fever, right? I always associated teething with fevers in both my daughters, but a small study out of Brazil suggests that fever and other severe signs and symptoms more »

  • Are Preschoolers’ Packed Lunches Unsafe?
    Are Preschoolers’ Packed Lunches Unsafe?
    Each workday morning, I struggle to get enough coffee into my system to enable me to prepare lunches for my two daughters, both of whom are in preschool. Honestly, making those lunches everyday – except Thursday, Thursday is pizza day at preschool, my favorite day – is a chore that takes an inordinate amount of more »

  • Tiniest Babies Soon Join Obesity Epidemic
    Tiniest Babies Soon Join Obesity Epidemic
    Looking at the tiniest babies in the neonatal intensive care unit at Jefferson – those who weigh less than two pounds and seem like you could hold them in the palm of your hand – it’s hard to imagine any of them weighing too much. Those extremely low birthweight newborns are at such high risk more »

  • Breastfeeding for Better Health
    Breastfeeding for Better Health
    The birth of a child is a joyous and life-changing event. And as every new parent – especially new moms – recognizes that along with the good comes a new host of responsibilities for the health and welfare of your new baby. For women who are able, breastfeeding your child is a good way to more »

  • Do We Overprotect Our Children?
    Do We Overprotect Our Children?
    New York Times article questions whether we have become so overprotective of our kids by building "safer" playgrounds that we are actually hurting their development.

  • Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware Tops in Lyme Disease
    Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware Tops in Lyme Disease
    Summertime means kids (and many adults) are out and about a lot, but it's also a time when ticks are out and spreading infections like Lyme disease.

  • Tiny Baby Flown from Bermuda to Jefferson for Care
    Tiny Baby Flown from Bermuda to Jefferson for Care
    Arianna, a beautiful and, all things considered, healthy baby, was flown to Jefferson soon after her birth because the hospital where she was born was not equipped to meet the needs of a baby born at 30-weeks gestation.

  • Danger to Kids in Portable Pools
    Danger to Kids in Portable Pools
    Portable pools are dangerous to children particularly those five and under, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics.

  • Why You Should Limit Your Child’s TV Time Before Bed
    Why You Should Limit Your Child’s TV Time Before Bed
    Preschool aged children who watch violent or scary TV or who watch TV before bed experience increased incidence of sleep problem, a study in the journal Pediatrics reports.

  • CDC Advisory Panel Recommends Vaccine for Pregnant Women to Protect Newborns Against Whooping Cough
    CDC Advisory Panel Recommends Vaccine for Pregnant Women to Protect Newborns Against Whooping Cough
    Amid a two-year surge in cases of whooping cough in the U.S., a key CDC advisory panel is recommending pregnant women get vaccinated late in their pregnancy to impart some protection to their newborns.

  • Nasal Spray Might Help Kids with Sleep Apnea
    Nasal Spray Might Help Kids with Sleep Apnea
    A small University of Chicago study suggests corticosteroid nasal spray may reduce inflammation in children with obstructive sleep apnea.

  • Treating Bug Bites Naturally
    Treating Bug Bites Naturally
    Dr. Daniel A. Monti, director of the Jefferson-Myrna Brind Center of Integrative Medicine, talks about natural remedies such as baking soda paste for mosquito and other bug bites.

  • Food Allergies in Children are Common and Often Serious
    Food Allergies in Children are Common and Often Serious
    Study finds the prevalence and severity of food allergies in children is greater than previously thought.

  • Pool and Beach Season and Swimmer’s Ear
    Pool and Beach Season and Swimmer’s Ear
    Memorial Day Weekend marks the traditional start of beach and pool season. And where there are kids (and adults) swimming, there is bound to be swimmer’s ear – acute otitis externa, the inflammation of the ear canal usually due to bacterial infections. In a recent analysis of swimmer’s ear in the U.S., the Centers for more »

  • Measles Cases Surging in the U.S.
    Measles Cases Surging in the U.S.
    Measles is a serious and sometimes deadly condition that has been largely controlled in the United States through vaccination efforts. But so far in 2011 there has been a surge in the number of reported cases according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). From January 1 through May 20 there were 118 more »

  • Pediatricians Urged to Encourage Parents to Quit Smoking
    Pediatricians Urged to Encourage Parents to Quit Smoking
    It’s not news that smoking is bad for you or that exposing your children to tobacco smoke is bad for them, but the estimates of the health impact of environmental exposure to smoke in children are staggering. From 150,000 to 300,000 cases of lower respiratory tract infections such as bronchitis and pneumonia in children are more »

  • Decreasing Antibiotic Use in Children to Slow Down Superbugs
    Decreasing Antibiotic Use in Children to Slow Down Superbugs
    When I was a kid, anyone referring to superbugs was probably talking about Atom Ant. If you’re of a certain age you’re thinking “up and at ‘em” about now. Today, superbugs are all about antibiotic resistance. The bugs aren’t cartoon characters but Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and worse – bacteria with names like “Klebsiella,” “Acinetobacter” more »

  • Babies and Vitamin D
    Babies and Vitamin D
    Are you pregnant? Got D? Vitamin D that is. Over the last several years innumerable studies have looked at the various health impacts of vitamin D (not having enough vitamin D, that is), which is suspected to contribute to a range of maladies from cancer to heart disease. But does too little vitamin D put more »

  • Liquid Medication Dosing Confusion Spurs Changes
    Liquid Medication Dosing Confusion Spurs Changes
    If you look in my medicine cabinet and on the shelves in the bathroom of my young daughters, you’ll find about a dozen syringes for liquid pain medications of various shapes and sizes. You’d also see a bunch of those liquid medication measuring cups that I’ve collected over the years as well as a bunch more »

  • Are You Protecting Your Baby?
    Are You Protecting Your Baby?
    It’s National Infant Immunization Week. Have you gotten your baby all her shots? Unfortunately, far too many parents in this country are choosing not to vaccinate their children against diseases that can be prevented by proper immunization. Whooping cough (pertussis), is a sad example. In 2009, ten infants in California died of the disease during more »

  • Kids’ TV Time and Cardiovascular Disease
    Kids’ TV Time and Cardiovascular Disease
    Ok, I admit it. I use the TV too much as a crutch to smooth the evening logistics with my kids. Yes, I love spending time with my daughters and would rather play or have family dance nights, but sometimes I’m just exhausted and want to sit quietly with a child snuggled on either side more »

  • Death Isn’t Only Risk for Preemies
    Death Isn’t Only Risk for Preemies
    In 2009 one in 12 babies born in Pennsylvania weighed 5½ pounds or less, and; 2,340 of those babies weighed in at less than 3.3 pounds. Those “very low birth weight” babies – the tiniest premature babies – are at the highest risk of dying during their first year of life. But they are also more »

  • Is Your Preschooler Getting Enough Physical Activity?
    Is Your Preschooler Getting Enough Physical Activity?
    Watching my 4-year-old daughter playing with her friends can be exhausting. To me they seem like perpetual motion machines, and it is hard to image any preschooler doesn’t get enough physical activity for their immediate and long-term health. Current guidelines call for 3- to 5-year-old children to get 120 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical more »

  • Being Firstborn Can Have Drawbacks, Including More Food Allergies
    Being Firstborn Can Have Drawbacks, Including More Food Allergies
    As a younger sibling, I always envied my older brother. He got to do everything first. He rode a bike first. He went to high school first. He learned to drive a car first. He always got to stay up later than me! Don’t get me wrong, I love my brother; it’s just that there more »

  • Are Childhood Ear Infections and Obesity Linked?
    Are Childhood Ear Infections and Obesity Linked?
    A small study by South Korean researchers sought to evaluate whether changes to the sense of taste resulting from the fluid draining from the ear after chronic ear infections is related to obesity in children. The researchers tracked 84 children, 42 of whom had so-called otitis media with effusion (COME), the thick fluid behind the more »

  • Give Your Kids Brain Food
    Give Your Kids Brain Food
    As a parent, I would do anything to help my daughters succeed in life. Reading books with them. Counting. Singing the ABCs. Working on their language and physical skills without being overbearing, I hope – I guess we’ll find out in 10 or 15 years. And I want my girls to eat well. I want more »

  • Shouldn’t You Vaccinate Your Kids for Chicken Pox?
    Shouldn’t You Vaccinate Your Kids for Chicken Pox?
    There’s a weird phobia in this country against vaccines. About 11 percent of parents skip or delay recommended vaccinations for their kids. Now, I’ve held both my screaming daughters while they got multiple shots recommended by our pediatricians, including annual flu shots. And I hate it each and every time. But it irritates me even more »

  • Hey Parents: Do You Know How Much Time Your Teen Spends on the Web?
    Hey Parents: Do You Know How Much Time Your Teen Spends on the Web?
    By now all parents have heard about the potential dangers to their kids lurking on the Internet, but what about the dangers of our kids spending too much time (or too little, as it turns out) on the Internet? A Swiss study published in the February issue of the journal Pediatrics found that adolescents who more »

  • Poor Sleep Patterns in Children Pose Health Risks
    Poor Sleep Patterns in Children Pose Health Risks
    Obese and overweight children have more disrupted sleep patterns, putting them at high risk of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and high cholesterol levels.