Jefferson Health

Cancer Genetics Specialties

You may be at risk for hereditary cancer if your family fulfills one or more of the following criteria:

  1. Two or more relatives in a family have been diagnosed with cancer
  2. Cancer has been diagnosed in a family member under the age of 50 years
  3. The same type of cancer has occurred in several members of a family
  4. More than one type of cancer has occurred in one member of a family
  5. A rare cancer has occurred in one or more members of a family
Our genetics team can help you find out if you are at risk for any of the following cancers:

Hereditary cancer syndromes occur in 5-10% of breast and ovarian cancers. The majority of cancers (70 - 90%), including breast and ovarian cancers, are not hereditary.

Our genetic counselor or advanced practice nurse will review your family and medical history and discuss with you your options. If you have a personal history of ovarian or breast cancer, were diagnosed with breast cancer at 45 or younger, in addition to other identifiers, you may meet criteria for genetic testing.

Contact Sue Miller-Samuel, MSN, RN, AGN-BC, at 215-955-9098, for a hereditary breast and ovarian cancer genetic consultation or for a cancer risk assessment.

The American Cancer Society identifies colorectal cancer as the third most common cancer in the United States.

The two major subtypes of hereditary colon cancer are called familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) also known as Lynch Syndrome. Women with this condition also have a high risk of developing cancer of the endometrium (lining of the uterus).

Our genetic counselor will review your family and medical history and discuss with you your options.

Schedule an appointment for a risk assessment by calling Stephanie Winheld, MS, LCGC Genetic Counselor, at 215-955-1011.

Hereditary cancer syndromes occur when a genetic change in DNA called a “mutation” is inherited from either parent. More information is emerging about the connection between hematologic and rare cancers and hereditary cancer syndromes.

For example, some leukemias have been associated with Li-Fraumeni syndrome, a rare cancer syndrome which is most often caused by a mutation in the TP53 gene.

Schedule an appointment to learn more about hematologic and rare cancer syndromes by calling Laura Gross, BA (Program Manager), at 215-503-5285.

Kidney Cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in both men and women. About 1 to 2 percent of renal cell cancers are hereditary, meaning that an increased risk for the disease runs in the family and a high lifetime risk for the disease is present.

Our genetic counselor will review the four major hereditary kidney cancer syndromes, your family and medical history and discuss your options with you.

Contact Laura Gross, BA (Program Manager), at 215-503-5285, for more information about hereditary kidney cancer.

Prostate cancer is a common cancer which affects one in seven American men during their lifetime. About 5 to 10 percent of all prostate cancers are hereditary, meaning that an increased risk for the disease runs in the family or an individual has a high lifetime chance of developing prostate cancer particularly at a young age.

Our genetic counselor will review your family and medical history and discuss with you your options.

Contact Laura Gross, BA (Program Manager), at 215-503-5285, for more information about hereditary prostate cancer.

Hereditary cancer syndromes occur when a genetic change in DNA called a “mutation” is inherited from either parent. Certain subsets of thyroid cancer are associated with hereditary cancer syndromes.

For example, medullary thyroid cancer is associated with a cancer syndrome called Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2 (MEN2). The gene associated with MEN2 is called RET. One out of 3 medullary thyroid carcinomas is caused by a mutation in the RET gene that can be passed on from parent to child.

Our genetic counselor will review your family/medical history and discuss with you your options.

Schedule an appointment for a risk assessment by calling Laura Gross, BA (Program Manager), at 215-503-5285.

Upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is a rare cancer of the renal pelvis or ureter, which allow urine to flow out of the kidney to the bladder. UTUC has recently been linked to hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, also known as Lynch syndrome.

Our genetic counselor will review your family and medical history and discuss with you your options.

Contact Laura Gross, BA (Program Manager), at 215-503-5285, for more information about hereditary upper tract urothelial cancer.